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18 November 2018

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As one astute person observed about the fracas when members of the Chinese delegation gate-crashed the PNG foreign minister in his office - "You don't shove a man from Wapenamanda around too easily."

Chinese diplomacy Mk2 - https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-11-18/chinese-officials-create-diplomatic-storm-at-apec/10508812

Not a great way to win friends and influence them. This just underscores my previous comment.

I'd hate to be in these blokes shoes come the eventual 'wash up' if it was just a 'flash in the pan' impulsive move. The situation will no doubt be discussed behind closed doors but maybe it depends on who is responsible and what impression they really wanted to convey?

Daniel - The answer is perfectly clear to anyone who has studied how an authoritarian regime works. Whether President Xi ordered the expulsion of national reporters or not is immaterial.

The policy of preventing potentially adverse articles being published by any non-state controlled media must be upheld at any cost. Chinese media are the only source of official information the Chinese people are allowed to see and it must be always in a good and positive light.

The only way that can happen is very tight control. This is just an example of what can happen when a free society bows to external pressure and allows another regime with different values to take over.

To look at this in a negative way means that the overall lesson can be lost in the indignant feelings being felt at the time.

The Chinese media are merely doing what they have been trained to do and will be held responsible and accountable if they allow any stuff ups.

'....a Chinese government funded school'. Some relevant questions:

How has it been funded, by loan or direct grant? Will it be a registered or permitted member school of the National Education System? How will staff be appointed? Will they be registered with the Teaching Service Commission for payment of salaries? Will they be on the same salary scales as teachers in registered schools?

On a recent visit I sighted wonderful buildings but no sign of teaching and learning materials, who will fund them?

Who will fund the care and maintenance of the buildings and grounds of such a huge campus? Based on such costs for a well maintained but much smaller private school, costs could be in the region of K1 million per annum.

So many questions and so little public information. Chinese openness, anyone?

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