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« The Crocodile Prize: aggregating a national identity | Main | Friend of PNG makes good as Steamships abandons Croc Prize »

02 June 2014

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The thing that made me hate Steamies and its fat cats so much is its pulling out at the very final month of the Crocodile Prize competition after many assurances that the cheque was forthcoming.

On the understanding that the payment was forthcoming, PNG Attitude accorded the bastard six months of prominence by way of advertisements.

It's a great shame Steamships and evidences a very poor corporate-community relationship.

Peter - James A Michener in his Tales of the South Pacific
quoted the late Fred Archer, the well known Rabaul
planter: "BP's means Bloody Pirates".

Looks like Steamships has earned that role now.

Interesting to investigate the dummy trade in copra plantations in PNG ('20's and '30s), managed by Burns Philp, Steamships and WR Carpenter (amongst others).

One notable beneficiary was Lyall Howard whose son became an interesting Australian prime minister.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyall_Howard

Did they give any reason? Surely the bad press they are now receiving is not worth it.

And if the 'little people' like us can contribute remind us how.

Maybe it's an opportunity for other major PNG companies to step up to the plate. Carpenters, I'm looking at you.
__________

As the published emails show, there was no explanation. On 23 May, the cheque was said to be in process; by 30 May it was all abandon ship, so to speak - KJ

Steamship needs a few lessons on the "triple bottom line" as an important competitive advantage for any company worth its salt in today's world.

So it is now up to the consumer to impress upon this company the value of corporate social responsibility.

Very disappointing.

This is totally irresponsible for a major corporate citizen in PNG.

This is really disappointing when individuals voluntarily make efforts to build a literate PNG and big companies like Steamship do not live up to their commitment to the people of PNG.

I thought Steamship was committed to improving the lives of Papua New Guineans, however this does not seem like it.

Their withdrawal and non-particpation in promoting and sustaining PNG literature this year is not reflective of a commitment to their loyal shoppers and PNG people generally. Very disappointing!

"Its story will not be short." Damn well said, Michael.

This is something we did not need to happen. The Crocodile Prize is a not for profit organisation and the impact of its activities is directly related to the sponsorship support.

Steamships support was essential to getting our job done properly.

The manner in which they have reneged their agreement is a betrayal of trust and indeed poor corporate behaviour.

It is one thing to bemoan the dearth of culturally relevant literature, lack of educational materials drawn from PNG writers and generally low standards of educational support - and quite another matter to actually do something about it.

I thought that was what Steamships was doing, particularly with their category, the short story.

Obviously I was wrong and this was only a passing fad to them.

Well, thanks Steamies, very. We are disappointed in this indifferent dumping, but not devastated by it.

The Crocodile Prize will not be a passing fad and its story will not be short.

That is sad and disappointing.

This is very sad.

Lousy bast%2%ds...

I do not really hold a high opinion of Steamships. Some of my perceptions are indeed shared by the wider business community.

(The story behind why Steamships lost a major nationwide Mobil fuel shipping contract to Inchape Shipping is a classic).

Their snubbing of the Crocodile Prize reflects their attitude towards PNG intellectuals in both public and private spheres of influence.

It also raises questions whether Steamships can be viewed as a reliable partner not just in the development of PNG literature but in the growth and development of PNG as a nation.

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