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21 January 2014

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I'd like to pay tribute to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

I don't know how they manage to keep those cemeteries and monuments in such wonderful and cared-for condition, in many countries all around the world. They are little oases of care and memory often in countries where this must be extremely difficult to maintain.

Bitapaka, Bomana, Wewak, Honiara - I have visited but a few, but have always been impressed with the care and devotion that is being taken to keep such sites in a beautiful state, despite civil unrest, massive local infrastructure problems, differing politics, surrounding poverty and diminishing memories.

How do they do it?

This article contains a good little summary of Australia's military history.
I realize that the ANZAC centenary will mainly focus on Australian forces in Europe during World War II. It is good to remember the small group that went to Rabaul. I remember the man from our street who disappeared in our first submarine and lies in the waters around Rabaul.
But one day we need to remind the people of Australia about the Fuzzy Wuzzy angels and what they did to protect Australia during World War II.

Some Australias who hear of all the trouble in PNG at the moment are starting to say things like "we should have never got mixed up with the place".

One day I hope thousands of Australian young people will make pilgrimages to PNG to see the battle site. The Kokoda Trail is excellent. But there were so many places where the ANZACs fought in PNG.

One of my Chinese friends in Epping was born in Wewak in the early 1930s and he and his family fled to Australia in the early 1940s.

Sadly many middle aged Australians have little knowledge about our time fighting in PNG and the role the native people of PNG played in making Australia what it is today.

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