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01 January 2013

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Wow! Thank you Francis for sharing this with everyone.

I still remember the stories told to me by my late grandmother and late Dad about this Bugla Ingu. It is till fresh in my memories despite the many years passed.

I really appreciate you sharing with those who missed out knowing the important event our ancestors use to have.
Wakai we diya.

Francis, I followed my fathers and big brothers to the Dom country for the singing and dancing in 1983-4 when the Dom people killed their pigs. That was the last one in Simbu. It was all aesthetic. No gathering including political and religious rallies in this age will trample the pig killing festival's awe and splendour. Christianity and western cultural hegemony (neo-liberal globalisation) have no respect for human dignity and a right to nationhood including retaining cultural values and practices. We might talk to our politicians to revive it however, this generation no longer take their spades and go to the gardens. All they do is wear faded western rags and droop around so how will they raise enough pigs to kill. All they wait for is an invitation to attend a feast and wine and dine.

The inevitable loss of traditions like this was a major reason why I, with my two daughters, sponsored the Cleland Family Prize for Heritage and Cultural writing within The Crocodile Prize.

It's bad enough that these customs don't continue, but my hope is that PNG writers will record them for posterity. They are all part of the fabric of your cultural history.

So, good on you Francis. You've got the makings of a Croc Prize entry with Bolga Ingu.

As usual an other brilliant piece.

In UPNG, I wrote a video review on the Shark Callers of Kontu. The actual video talked about the coming of the Western economic system and how it changed the life of the villages.

The logic behind the change in New Ireland is similar to Simbu and the rest of PNG.

Very informative and educational post. Thanks for posting.

Karimui-Nomane is my home and I am very happy to see your post about my home.

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